Hallie Chouinard

Hallie Chouinard

News Director

Phone: 406-791-5450
Email: hallie.chouinard@krtv.com

What is your job?
My job is to lead our newsroom’s work wherever we produce journalism. That means I lead the teams that create the local news you see on KRTV and KRTV.com. I also anchor and produce the 5:30pm news.
When did you start working here?
I started working for KRTV in September 2019. But this isn’t my first stop in Montana.My first job in television news was in Kalispell.
Where else have you worked?
After my stint as a producer/reporter in Kalispell I went to Vermont to produce at a start-up news organization.From there, I went to Tampa Bay as a producer, where I was promoted to Executive Producer.
Where did you go to college?
I went to Lyndon State College (now called Northern Vermont University) where I earned two bachelor’s degrees: Broadcast Journalism & Broadcast Production and Design.
Where did you grow up?
Vermont
What are some of the biggest news stories you have covered or led coverage of?
While in Kalispell, I was able to cover the return of fugitive Jerry Ambrozuk, who’d been a fugitive for 20+ years after crashing a plane and leaving his girlfriend to drown.While in Vermont, we had extensive coverage of the search for a missing girl, turns out her own uncle was trying to recruit her into a sex ring and killed her.In Florida, hurricane season seemed the most intense. You work 12 hours on, 12 off and sleep in empty offices. Hurricane Irma caused serious damage when I was there, my dogs – were not impressed!
What is your philosophy on news?
I believe local journalism empowers us all - knowledge is power. Knowing what is happening in our communities allows us, as neighbors, to help and make a difference. It’s our job to understand what is happening in our area and shine a light on problems. At the same time, we must accurately reflect what is happening in our community.
What do you love about living here?
I love the Montana scenery, the fresh air and the genuine people.I love that where I live – there is no light pollution and it seems as if you see every star in the sky. In the summer the moon is so big and bright it doesn’t get dark until after 10pm.And not to mention the wildlife! There’s nothing like waking up to the sound of a newborn fawn crying out to its mama, or a bobcat screeching by the river, or a bear… trying to get into your garbage!

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