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Montana Ag Network: State Grain Labs Are Important to Montana Farmers

State Grain Labs Are Important to Montana Farmers
State Grain Labs Are Important to Montana Farmers
State Grain Labs Are Important to Montana Farmers
Posted at 12:32 PM, May 30, 2021
and last updated 2021-05-30 14:54:30-04

Montana farmers raise some of the highest quality barley, wheat and pulses in the world. And the State Grain Labs guarantee protein grade and other qualities that serve as the basis for price settlements between buyers and sellers.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Montana State Grain Labs, which are located in Great Falls and here in Plentywood. Bureau Chief Dan Reimer says just like they did in the beginning, the state grain labs continue to serve a very important purpose for both Montana farmers and our export customers around the world.

“The labs are the only federally licensed labs in the state,” said Reimer. “So, any of our producers needing certification to be able to ship out of country and support the world is going to come through us or one of the ports. We are it in Montana for the official certifications and that's very important. It requires all the federal licensing for our staff so they're always doing the same job, the same way, and our customers can count on it being accurate.”

As the new State Grain Lab Bureau Chief, he’s looking forward to providing customers with the best possible service while always looking at ways to improve. “That's extremely important,” said Reimer. “Some of my work through manufacturing and engineering, I've developed a number of processes and a number of operations to do just that, striving for zero defects and making sure everybody was creating in this case the same way-both labs and every person the same. One of my big marching orders to start with is to bring that to the labs and make sure we're as good as we can be.”

State Grain Labs Are Important to Montana Farmers

Established in 1921, the State Grain Labs are now in their 100th year of providing producers and agricultural businesses with quality assurance and consistent, unbiased results.

“The Montana Grain Standards Bureau was actually started in 1921 in the Ford Building in downtown Great Falls,” said Reimer. "The building we're in now, 30 years later, was basically donated to us for one dollar. We've been working out of there since. That's quite a history and legacy that I want to protect and make sure we keep going.”

The Great Falls lab will soon be recruiting for motivated workers who enjoy a dynamic work schedule to join their team for the upcoming harvest season through the State of Montana Careers Website.